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Electric cars are put to the test

elextric carElectric cars could bring Germany one step closer to achieving the planned energy reform, but so far they have not managed to penetrate the market. Computer scientists at FAU are carrying out research into how to make the changeover on the roads successful. With the help of their partners from industry, they sent a small fleet of electric cars out onto the streets of the Nuremberg Metropolitan Region. The collaborative project e-NUE, part of the federal government’s initiative ‘Schaufenster Elektromobilität’ which focuses on electromobility, is now in its second phase. more...

  • Tensile tests for breast implants

    mplant shellMillions of women worldwide have silicon implants to enlarge their breasts or as part of reconstructive surgery after breast cancer. This procedure is not without risk – a fact which was highlighted by the scandal surrounding the French company Poly Implants Prothèse (PIP). The silicon which the company used in its implants had not been approved for medical devices and was in fact a much cheaper form of industrial silicon. The disastrous consequence of this was that many of the implants ruptured. The scandal two years ago prompted researchers at FAU to investigate the silicon used in breast implants. The EU Commission has recently recommended a procedure which is used to compare the quality of implants that was developed by a team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Dirk W. Schubert at the Institute of Polymer Materials in Erlangen. more...

  • Activating the wasabi receptor to control blood pressure: a tale of two gases

    Blood vessels in the meningesBetter blood circulation, lower blood pressure and a stronger heart beat, who wouldn’t want this? This has been a long sought goal of pharmaceutical companies as well. One biomolecule, called nitroxyl (HNO), offers all 3 in 1. However, the mechanisms of its formation in the body and its actions were elusive until recently. In their study recently published in "Nature Communication", Eberhardt and colleagues answer all this and a bit more, offering a promise for patients with advanced cardiovascular problems. more...